Why go Camping?

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camp jelly 4Visit www.campjellystone.com to see our new infographic.

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Useful Camping Tips and Places You Can Go

Camping is a time honored American tradition. Approximately 40 million people go camping each year. Let’s explore where you and your family can go camping?

Why You Might Like Camping in Colorado

It’s no surprise that many people end up heading to Colorado for great camping and hiking adventures. It’s the only state that is 100% above 3,000 feet, and it has the mountains, peaks and amazing views to show for it, every season of the year. Colorado is a good choice for hunting, boating, and fishing.

Why New York Camping isn’t Just a Big Apple

Why go camping in New York? Believe it or not, the city only comprises a very small section of the state, many areas of which are forested and great for summer or fall camping. New York also has many spots for RV campgrounds, making it an appealing choice for families who don’t plan on roughing it in a tent. New York has many rivers, streams and lakes that help make for great camping sites.

The Appeal of Camping in Ohio

Camping in Ohio can be fun year-round, and there are almost 50 different campgrounds available in the state. For horse lovers, Ohio even has many equestrian camping sites, where visitors can enjoy locations next to bridle trails as well as normal camping conveniences, such as drinking water and picnic tables.

Three Useful Camping Tips No Matter Where You Are

    • Have a plan in place for dealing with food and trash storage, which can attract unwanted animals if you’re not careful. Most animals can break through simple closed bags. In areas where bears are native, never keep food or waste near you while you are sleeping.
  • Teach kids the camping “rule of three,” where you only pick up a living thing for three seconds, take three steps, and show it to three people. This not only helps preserve ecosystems, but teaches kids a valuable lesson about respecting the natural environment around them.
    • Get ingredients for fun campfire snacks before you go. To make “squirrel tails,” bring a can of biscuits, butter, and a sugar/cinnamon mixture. Wind the biscuit around a stick (like a tail) and cook it in the fire. Then, dunk it in butter, and dip it in the sugar for a delicious treat.

    Have you gone camping in Ohio, or anywhere else? Let us know in the comments.

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Going Camping With Your Family? A Few Tips Worth Knowing

Did you know that, much like cats, raccoon purr when they feel safe and content? Hopefully if you go camping, you won’t necessarily be finding out whether this fact is true or not. Camping, it can be said, is one of the great American pastimes, and about 40 million people in the U.S. choose to go camping each year. Not only can it be a great way to relax with friends and family, but it’s also a fairly affordable vacation option. If you are thinking of going camping this year? Here are several facts you should keep in mind.

    • Never, or rarely, been camping before? No problem. There are, however, some lessons you’d probably rather not learn the hard way. One lesson is to always properly secure your trash — and do so away from where you’re sleeping so that if animals do come, they won’t be trampling through your things. The idea of raccoons purring might be cute in theory, but it’s less cute if they’re purring contentedly after raiding your s’mores stash.
    • Find recipes for fun campfire foods. Don’t just stick to hot dogs — try out something new! There are many neat, easy recipes that use tinfoil or fruit as a ‘bowl” to cook various savories and desserts. Check out “banana boats” for one yummy example.
  • Have more to start the fire than just a lighter. You won’t always be lucky enough to have very dry wood and a no-wind day, and many people find out the hard way that a box of matches and a few sticks aren’t enough to build a fire. Newspaper and lighter fluid are good to have.

Where Should You Go? You can either find a park nearby, or take this as an opportunity for a road trip and see what’s out there. Camping in Colorado comes highly rated by several camping experts who cite its beautiful mountains, and national parks.

    • If you’re in the north, try camping in Ohio. There are many campgrounds open year long.
    • RV camping is fairly popular, and an alternative to having to pitch up a tent. If you don’t own an RV, you can rent one. RV campgrounds can be a good choice, and are specifically set up to accommodate RVs.
    • Not surprisingly, our park campgrounds offers, water features, great accommodations and so much more! It helps to plan your budget, and enjoy your stay with no concerns!

Have you gone camping in Ohio or anywhere else? Let us know in the comments.

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How to Plan a Camping Trip

While winter camping in Ohio is not for everyone, spring is right around the corner, bringing with it warm breezes and bright sunshine. This means that now is the perfect time to start planning an awesome trip camping in Ohio. Here are a few tips to help you arrange and prepare such a spring-time trip!

1. Who Are You Going With?

While you don’t really need anyone at all to go camping, some of the most fun trips are the ones we make with the people we’re closest to. Gauge your family’s interest in a camping trip, and if they’re all for it, sign them up. Ask your significant other as well if he or she is interested. A nice getaway into the woods can be the perfect romantic retreat. Don’t forget about your closest group of friends as well.

2. Find Your Campsite Online.

One of the best things about camping in Ohio is our parks! Our website can help you find the perfect campsite. This allows you to explore the different accommodations and  amenities that different parks offer. Choose a park whose settings and activities are right for your group.

3. Gather the Necessities.

It’s incredibly beneficial to just keep your camping stuff in storage tubs. This will prevent the hassle of getting things together in the future, and it keeps the current trip organized. Each person’s choice of supplies vary, but it’s generally a good idea to keep a big tub full of: tents, sleeping bags, sleeping pads, first aid kits, lanterns, flashlights, tarps, spare batteries, matches, wet wipes, bug spray, trash bags, and cooking supplies.

It doesn’t matter if you prefer tent camping, RV camping, or cabin camping in Ohio, just so long as you get out there and experience the wide, wonderful world that our beautiful country has to offer this spring. If you have any questions about finding suitable sites or RV parks to go camping in Ohio, feel free to ask in the comments.

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Calling All Ohio Campers! Is This Your First Time Going Cabin Camping?

If you were to guess how many people go camping in the United States every year, what would your guess be? A few thousand? Maybe a couple million? According to Statista.com, almost 40 million Americans go camping every year. Many Americans just like the feeling of heading into the woods to live as their ancestors did, while others like to go cabin camping in Ohio to give themselves an opportunity to fish, roast s’mores over an open fire, and just relax.

Whether you’re taking your family camping or you’re looking to get away to enjoy the great outdoors with the guys, cabin camping is the best way to do it. You don’t have to set up a tent, you don’t have to worry about the elements, and you don’t have to sleep on the ground. Even so, there are a few things you should keep in mind to ensure a fun, fulfilling trip.

How to Prepare for Cabin Camping in Ohio or Elsewhere

Know What’s Included in Your Ohio Cabins Reservation

      The best campgrounds in Ohio, like those in Mt. Gilead, offer cabins with a queen sized bed, two twin-style bunk beds, and a full-sized convertible futon, meaning you can fit your whole family without a fuss. On the other hand, many low-end cabin rentals services give you only the bare basics.
      One thing to consider before heading off for cabin camping in Ohio is to ask about the included accommodations and amenities.  Many cabins offer full electric, including heat, television, and more. However, a huge number of campers prefer the more rustic camping experience that comes with having to split their own wood and light their own fires. Call the campground ahead of time to find out what it is equipped with.
        Remember, no matter how you camp, you will always have a great time camping with friends at www.CampJellystone.com

 

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Learn about Family Camping!

Learn more about some family camping tips!
Learn more about some family camping tips!

Learn more about some family camping tips!

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RV Vacations: Drive Across the Country in Style

Vacation is about exploring somewhere new and escaping the rigors of everyday life, and what better way to explore than in a camper or motor home. The comforts of home and the open road combine to create the ultimate RV vacation experience. Road warriors take advantage of good food, ultimate freedom and an inexpensive mode of transportation. Oftentimes after a trip filled with exotic terrain and fun activities, the road-trip jokes and conversations leave a lasting impression. RV traveling emphasizes comradery and leads to lifelong memories.

Before you hit the highway, school yourself on these time-tested road rules.

RV Vacation Rules:

Spring for Insurance: Whether your renting an RV or driving your own, vehicle insurance will cover your RV in the case of an accident on the road. Be careful inside, however, many road insurance providers don’t cover interior damage.

Inspect the RV: You can’t eliminate the risk of a breakdown, but checking the RV’s tire pressure and liquid levels will start your trip with the right foot forward. Fill up tires to their ideal pressure, which is listed on the tire wall, and check that oil and coolant levels are stable.

Plan for the Worst: Hopefully, you never need to use it, but a thorough medical kit is a necessity when traveling cross country. Basic items such bandages, ibuprofen and and gauze should be included as well as more involved items like an EpiPen and burn relief ointment.

Map Your Stops: Positioned near some of the most beautiful terrain in the U.S., campgrounds offer a great opportunity to meet like-minded travelers. The wind may blow you in a unique direction, but planned stops will help you make the most of your trip. GocampingAmerica.com lists information on RV parks across the U.S.

Don’t Pack Too Much: Only pack enough clothes and food for a few days. You can do laundry at campgrounds and buy food in towns you visit. A camper may feel like home, but that doesn’t mean you have to bring your entire wardrobe.

Don’t Overbuy: When you purchase souvenirs, take care not to overcrowd your motor home; you can ship large items home.

Limit Driving: Try not to drive more than 400 miles each day. Take the time to stop and enjoy sites. Too much driving dulls your senses and increases risk plus, vacation is about enjoying the ride, so why not take a look around?

Plan Meals: Plan your meals as best as you can. Most RVs come equipped with a limited kitchen, so it’s possible to stock a freezer with meat and produce. Take advantage of grilling at camp locations as much as possible to avoid lingering smells in the camper and to avoid clutter.

Look for Bargains: Search the Internet for inexpensive local campgrounds.

Travel Off-Season: Plan your trip during less popular vacation times for big savings and less-crowded attractions.

The time is now to start planning your cross-country road trip adventure. Take the time to map out your route and find fun and unusual attractions and sites to visit along the way as you explore Americas roads.

Post by Dee Paulson

A retired world history teacher, Dee travels the world and shares cultural and political viewpoints in her stories online. She visits Cairo and Italy every year.

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Take Part in the NWF’s Great American Backyard Campout

backyard campout

The team at Jellystone Parks is all for getting more kids playing outdoors, so we wanted to pass this message along from the National Wildlife Federation.

Spend the night under the stars with National Wildlife Federation and take your family’s first step into a lifetime filled with healthy, outdoor fun.

Did you know that today, 25% of kids play outside daily—as opposed to 75% a generation ago? Be a part of the Great American Backyard Campout and set an example for children that will get them excited about the great outdoors. Join thousands of campers on June 23 (or you can choose another day that’s convenient for you). Embrace an active, healthy outdoor lifestyle—we’ll show you how.

Improving your Kids’ Health is Rewarding for Them…….and for You!

You have the option to help support NWF’s work to connect kids with nature for their overall good health by raising money for our programs. You can set a personal or team fundraising goal, invite your friends and family to support your Campout, and earn the official Campout t-shirt. It’s easy—we’ll give you all the tips and tools you need to be successful plus the added reward of happier, healthier kids.

Visit www.backyardcampout.org for more information and to sign up.

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Garbage Can Dinner for Camping

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Looking for an easy campsite recipe that will feed a hungry group? Check out this Garbage Can Dinner from Jellystone Park Campground guest Stephanie Miller. This hearty meal is cooked over the campfire and feeds 12-18 people.
 
18 ears of corn, unhusked
5 lbs. medium potatoes, washed but uncut
5 large onions, peeled
8 lbs. sausage (any kind)
1 lb. carrots, peeled
 
Prepare a 30-gallon galvanized garbage can, including the lid, by heating over your campfire until it’s black inside and out. When cool, wash well. This process removes the galvanizing chemical, which is toxic.
 
Stand up corn in bottom of can. Top with whole potatoes, onions, carrots and then sausage. Fill with water just to cover food by an inch.
 
Arrange two concrete bricks on either side of your campfire. Set the garbage can on the bricks; cover and cook one hour. Remove can from fire and serve, using a large slotted spoon.

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Celebrate National Water Safety Month with Safe Swimming Tips from Experts

girl jumping in pool

Although May is officially Water Safety Month, it’s something we should practice year-round. Check out these great water safety tips from the International Swimming Hall of Fame, and be sure to visit www.nationalwatersafetymonth.com for more great information and resources to keep your family safe and happy at home and on vacation.
 

always practice water safety

• Teach children water safety and swimming skills as early as possible.
• Always brief babysitters on water safety, emphasizing the need for constant supervision.
• Appoint a “designated watcher” to monitor children during social gatherings at or near pools.
• Equip doors and windows that exit to a pool area with alarms.
• Install a poolside phone, preferably a cordless model, with emergency numbers programmed into speed-dial.
• Post CPR instructions and learn the procedures.
• Keep rescue equipment poolside. Don’t wait for the paramedics to arrive because you will lose valuable life-saving seconds. Four to six minutes without oxygen can cause permanent brain damage or death.
• Keep a first aid kit at poolside.
• Install four-sided isolation fencing, at least five feet high, equipped with self-closing and self-latching gates, that completely surrounds the pool and prevents direct access from the house and yard.
• Maintain constant visual contact with children in a pool or pool area. If a child is missing, check the pool first; seconds count in preventing death or disability.
• Don’t use flotation devices as a substitute for supervision. Never allow a young child in a pool without an adult.
• Don’t leave objects such as toys that might attract a child in the pool and pool area.
• Never prop the gate to a pool area open.
• Don’t rely on swimming lessons, life preservers, or other equipment to make a child “water safe.”
• Never assume someone else is watching a child in a pool area.
• Don’t leave chairs or other items of furniture where a child could use them to climb into a fenced pool area.
• Don’t think you’ll hear a child who’s in trouble in the water; child drowning is a silent death, with no splashing to alert anyone that the child is in trouble.

Here’s to a safe swimming season in 2011!

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