Oklahoma Jellystone Park Wins Award for Excellence in Camping Industry

Lake Eufaula camping

Al and Rose Sahli, owners of Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park campground at Lake Eufaula, have been recognized as Operator of the Year by the Jellystone Park franchise system.

The Operator of the Year Award is given to the individual or team directly responsible for the day-to-day operation of a Camp-Resort in recognition of excellence in management and customer service, improvement of inspection scores and growth of business. The award was presented at the annual meeting of the Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort group in Cincinnati.

Lake Eufaula camping

Al & Rose Sahli

“We are so excited to be recognized as Operators of the Year,” said Al Sahli. “We truly love taking care of our guests, and our staff is the best in the great state of Oklahoma. We’re proud to bring families a great budget-friendly way to enjoy each other and make wonderful memories.”

Located on the beautiful sandy shores of Oklahoma’s largest lake, the campground offers the best swimming, boating and fishing experience under the Oklahoma sun. Every campsite and cabin offers a view of beautiful Lake Eufaula; RV campsites are full hookup and cabins offer flat-screen TVs, kitchens and sleep up to six people. Two sandy swimming beaches, a swimming pool and a Wibit floatable sports complex and waterslide provide wet and wild fun for all ages; paddleboats, canoes and pontoon boats are also available. Kids will love panning for sparkling keepsakes at Rock Creek Gem Mining; if they have any energy left, families can check out the playground and enjoy a meal at the onsite restaurant or Snack Shack (or boost their energy at the park’s Starbucks.)

In 2013, a full schedule of themed weekends is planned, starting with the Sailboat Regatta at Eufaula Marina Cove May 16-19. Summer weekends include Father’s Day Weekend June 14-16; Eufaula’s Whole Hawg Festival July 25-29; and Totally Retro Week August 16-19.

Jellystone Park Camp-Resort at Lake Eufaula is located at 610 Lakeshore Drive in Eufaula and opens for the season on May 18.

 

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Marion, NC Jellystone Park Team Earns Entrepreneur of the Year

camping in north carolina

The Garcia family, owners of Jellystone Park campground in Marion, North Carolina, have been recognized with the Entrepreneur of the Year Award by the Jellystone Park franchise system. The award recognizes Camp-Resorts that show a strong growth in business over the prior year. It was presented in Cincinnati at the annual meeting of the Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort group.

camping in north carolina

Lisa Garcia holding the Yogi Bear trophy.

The Garcia family purchased the park in 2007 – the culmination of a longstanding dream. “My parents both enjoyed successful hotel careers with prominent brands, including Ritz-Carlton and St. Regis. Even with free nights at these swanky hotels, we camped everywhere we went,” said owner Alex Garcia Jr., who manages the park with his dad, Alex Sr., mom Lisa and brother Chris. “It was my parents’ goal to get our family to embrace and appreciate Mother Nature.  Our family dream was to open our own campground. When we grew up and moved away, we became wrapped up in our own lives and missed our great memories together, so we started talking and decided to purchase the campground to help other families establish memories of their own.”

Garcia continued, “We made so many memories through camping and we still cherish those memories today. We work to make Jellystone Park Marion a place where families create lifetime memories of their own.”

This North Carolina campground, visited by more than 40,000 guests in 2012, is nestled at the base of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. The 64-acre park boasts 80 full hook-up RV sites; pop-up and tent sites; and cozy North Carolina cabins overlooking a five-acre lake. In warm weather, guests can enjoy paddleboats, canoes and kayaks on the water, and then relax with 18 holes of miniature golf onsite. A 300-foot waterslide, junior Olympic pool and kiddie pool help beat the summer heat, while fishing, crafts, bag toss, dances, swimming, s’more roasts, volleyball, bingo, and movies under the stars at the amphitheater ensure the entire family enjoys their stay. The park is also a great home base for exploring the North Carolina mountains, with an easy drive to Chimney Rock, Grandfather Mountain and Linville Caverns.

Themed weekends for the 2013 season begin March 15-17 with Wake Up the Bears with a Lucky Twist weekend, a combination welcome back to Yogi Bear™ and St. Patrick’s Day celebration. Through the spring, summer and fall, there will be themed activities every weekend. Examples include Junior Ranger Weekend, when kids can learn about conservation and preserving our environment; Surfin’ Safari Week; and Hollywood Superstar Week.

The Jellystone Park Camp-Resort in Marion, NC is located at 1210 Deacon Drive Marion, NC and opens March 15 for the 2013 camping season.  Check them out if you are camping in North Carolina!

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Pennsylvania Jellystone Park Earns Top Inspection Award

pittsburgh jellystone park

The management team and staff at Jellystone Park campground near Pittsburgh, PA, have been recognized with the Carroll Award, which is presented to the Jellystone Park receiving the highest inspection score among the 79 campgrounds in the Jellystone Park system.  The Carroll Award was presented at the annual meeting of the Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort franchise system in Cincinnati, Ohio.

pittsburgh jellystone park

Denny Quigley with daughter, Tammy, and granddaughter.

“We are truly honored to win the Carroll Award for 2013,” said owner Denny Quigley, who owns Jellystone Park at Kozy Rest with his wife, Kathy. “We appreciate that the hard work of our staff and their attention to detail is recognized.” The Quigleys run the park with their son Gary and his family.

Nestled in the beautiful countryside of Western Pennsylvania, the family-oriented campground offers shaded, level, generously-sized, full-hookup RV campsites; tent and pop-up campsites; and 12 cabin and yurt vacation rentals - including four brand-new for 2013. Guests will also find the Kozy Club Arena, a special group camping area with 23 campsites clustered around a picnic pavilion and recreation hall – perfect for family reunions, church outings and group gatherings. The pet-friendly resort offers a dog park; two-legged guests will enjoy gem mining, a pool and playground, miniature golf, a game room, hiking trails, bicycle rentals and more. The Quigleys are currently renovating and doubling the size of the park’s office and store.

The Kozy Rest staff constantly strives for improvement, attending educational seminars in the off-season to make sure every guest’s visit is one to remember. In-season (mid-April through October), a full activities schedule with themed weekends ensures family fun. The 2013 calendar includes a Pets-R-Family Weekend (May 3-5); Chocolate Fun Weekend (May 31-June 2); and Zoofari Weekend (August 2-4). Every weekend offers ceramics, bingo, and rides on the park’s train and its beloved fire truck.

 

 

 


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Valentine’s Day with Yogi Bear™

What could be better for Valentine’s Day than a pic-a-nic? Celebrating the weekend o’love with the bear himself at a Jellystone Park™ Camp-Resort!  At Jellystone Park Hill Country in Canyon Lake, Texas, February 15-17 is Valentine’s Day Special Weekend, offering two nights for the price of one on all accommodations. Treat your special someone to Texas-sized hospitality and a quiet, relaxing getaway perfect for sweethearts.   Farther north, check out the Valentine’s Getaway at Jellystone Park Mammoth Cave in beautiful Kentucky. Also February 15-17, the Mammoth Cave team invites you to escape from the winter chill and rekindle the flame by cuddling up together in one of their new Cumberland Cabins, which feature cozy electric fireplaces.   Check with your favorite year-round park to see what they’ve got cookin’ for the most romantic weekend of the year!

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The History of Halloween

Was that a witch whizzing through the air? A ghost peeking around that twisted tree stump? A vampire stalking you through the cemetery? Could be – the howling winds of October are upon us and with them come all sorts of otherworldly creatures and customs. Historians are divided on Halloween’s true origins; some believe the holiday is based on the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, while others take it back as far as Roman celebrations of ancestors and the dead. Just about everybody agrees that the Halloween we celebrate today is based in the old Christian holidays of All Saints Day and All Souls Day, which were reserved for praying for the recently departed who had yet to reach heaven.

The word “Halloween” itself is likely a Scottish variant on the title “All Hallows Eve,” the day before All Saints Day, and was first seen in the 15th century.   Today, Halloween is second only to Christmas in retail sales, and is rapidly gaining due to increasing interest in decorating our homes and yards; yet Halloween celebrations remained largely the domain of Ireland and Scotland, reaching North America in the mid-19th century when immigrants from those countries brought their traditions to the United States. From carving pumpkins to asking for candy, here’s a quick look at those traditions and their meaning.

Jack o’Lanterns

A favorite for many families, the carving of pumpkins began with the humble turnip. A British term dating from the 17th century, “jack o’lantern” literally means “man with a lantern.” Catholic children in the British Isles carried hollowed-out turnips (more likely rutabagas, not the small turnips we eat here) with carved faces, lit by a candle, as they went door-to-door begging for soul cakes on All Saints’ and All Souls’ Day. When Irish and Scottish families began settling in the United States, they traded the turnip for the more readily available pumpkin, and our pumpkin carving tradition began.

Bobbing for Apples

No Halloween party is complete without a tub full of water and apples. While potentially messy, bobbing for apples has been a traditional game for at least a few hundred years. Again originating in Ireland and Scotland, it was most likely a divination (or fortune-telling) game. Partygoers would attempt to catch an apple in their mouths, peel it carefully in one piece, throw the peel over their shoulders, and turn around to find it in the shape of the first initial of their true love’s name.

Trick or Treating

One of the most beloved sights of Halloween are the parades of children dressed in their costumes and makeup, roaming the neighborhood and begging door-to-door for treats. Trick-or-treating has its roots in the Middle Ages custom of Christmas wassailing, when people went door to door asking for food and drink. It also resembles the medieval practice of “souling,” when poor people canvassed neighbors asking for food in exchange for prayers for the dead.

However you choose to celebrate Halloween, the Jellystone Park™ Camp-Resorts team wishes you happy haunting!   Click here for Fall and Halloween events at Jellystone campgrounds. 

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Yogi Bear Aids Marriage Proposal

marriage.

It was time to celebrate at the Jellystone Park campground in Montrose, Colorado when Yogi helped a guest propose to his girlfriend. She said Yes!

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10 Rules for Glamping

I came across this article on aupairs.org and thought it was funny.  This list is for someone who really doesn’t like to get dirty!  For #4, at Jellystone Parks, we may not set up a tent for you, but we have plush cabins with all the comforts of home.  As for #7 on the list, Jellystone Parks are all about families so we say “Bring the Kids!” and let us entertain them while you relax around the campfire.

1.Do not make your own food.  When you go glamping you will be treated to gourmet food cooked by a chef.  Depending on the experience, the food could be cooked over an open fire on-site where you can watch or it might come on a tray already prepared elsewhere.  If you go to Las Ventanas al Paraiso in tropical Cabo San Lucas you will experience a wonderful private moonlit dinner on the beach before you sleep under the stars on the roof of the hotel.

2.Do not make your own bed.  One of the many benefits of glamping is that there are people around to take care of the work for you.  With glamping you get out into nature and enjoy the relaxing environment, without all of the work.

3.Do not make your own fire.  When glamping, the fire pit is lit before you can even snap your fingers.  Forget sitting on a rock or a stump that you pull up around the fire.  When glamping you are provided with soft comfy chairs or benches.

a "glamping" tent

4.Do not set up your own tent.  While there are resorts and other locations that make you set up your own tent because they feel that you are glamping at their facility because you can go into the resort and get a massage, work out or buy a mixed drink, take note: these places are just fancy campgrounds.  To be glamping you won’t need to get your hands dirty, unless you want to.  The tents are already set up and the bed is made with luxury linens, unless you sleep in an air conditioned RV, cabin or Yurt, of course.

5.Do not sleep on the ground.  Beds are provided for you.  Sometimes they are very exotic canopy beds and other times they are traditional beds, but they have a nice mattress for you to sleep on so there’s no need to worry about creepy crawlies or having to use a rock for a pillow.  With glamping you can enjoy luxury linens and down comforters.

 

6.You must take in your surroundings.  Some glamping areas are buried in the heart of the city, but you are sleeping out under the stars and everything is taken care of for you.  When glamping in the city it’s a little like when you were a kid and you pitched a tent in the backyard.  There are things to go and do within walking distance.  Many other glamping locations are set in perfect surroundings; overlooking a beautiful lake, high on a hill where you can see for miles, in the mountains where you need to be dropped by helicopter, or on an island where you can only arrive by boat.

7.Leave the kids at home.  Some camps don’t mind kids and there are lots of things for them to do.  In fact, places like Normandy Farms in Massachusetts have kids sized cabins that can be placed on your site for the kids to play and sleep in. Others consider glamping an adult only affair where the crowd is able to commune with nature and enjoy adult food and drinks. Be sure to know if your resort is family friendly before you pack up the kids.

8.Don’t wash the dishes.  In a true glamping experience, meals will be served on china instead of plastic or paper.  There is nothing glamorous about paper plates and plastic forks.  You don’t wash the dishes when you eat at a restaurant and the experience will be similar while you are glamping.

9.Don’t bring an alarm clock.  When you are out in nature you will wake up with the sun or whenever you feel like getting up.  If you want to take an early morning stroll just let the concierge know and he will wake you gently.  Bring a sleeping mask if you’d like to sleep past sunrise.

10.De-stress and enjoy yourself.  The most important rule of glamping is to show up ready to relax and to have fun.  Glamping is expensive and only for those that aren’t worried about the money they are spending.  Massages are often offered right in your tent.  Sometimes live music will be provided for your entertainment.  Sit back, relax and just enjoy the glamping experience.

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Campjellystone Is Now on Twitter

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Want to keep up with specials, deals, activities, news and more from Jellystone Parks? Follow Camp Jellystone on Twitter!

In addition to up-to-the-minute news on all your favorite parks, you’ll see camping tips, trends and information you won’t find anywhere else.

Follow us – where else? – @campjellystone. We’ll see you on Twitter!

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Help Stop the Asian Longhorned Beetle From Killing Trees

beetle

The following information was given to members of the American Camp Association from the USDA. We wanted to pass it along to our campers who love trees as much as we do! Visit www.BeetleBusters.info to report a sighting or for more information, or call their toll free hotline at 1-866-702-9938. If you would like more information, please feel free to email Rhonda.J.Santos@aphis.usda.gov

You may already be familiar with the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), an invasive insect that feeds on certain species of hardwood trees, eventually killing them. The pest most likely arrived in the United States unknowingly inside wood packing material from Asia. Since its discovery here in 1996, the beetle has caused tens of thousands of trees to be destroyed in Ohio, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Illinois.

The beetle threatens our nation’s camps and recreational areas, our forests, and suburban and urban trees. If it becomes established in the United States, the invasive insect has the potential to cause more damage than Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight and gypsy moth combined, destroying millions of acres of our hardwoods, including national forests and parks and even our own backyard trees. The recreation, timber, nursery, and maple syrup industries alone could suffer severe losses, not to mention the environmental and ecological impacts.
It is my love of the outdoors and of trees that keeps me passionate about my work with the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). I believe in the mission to save trees from this insect. Combined with your commitment to provide discovery, education, and service, I’m hoping we can stop this insect. After all, an ALB infestation is a sad tale for trees, since the trees are essentially being eaten alive. 

Here’s how this insect kills a tree from the inside out: in her lifetime the adult female chews up to 90 egg sites directly on the bark of a tree and that’s where she will lay her eggs. After the eggs hatch in roughly 2 weeks, the worm-like larvae tunnel into the growing layers of the tree. After several weeks, the larvae tunnel into the woody tissue of the tree, where they continue to feed and develop over the winter. This feeding and burrowing causes the tree to weaken and eventually die. In the spring, beetle larvae develop into an adult insect. In the early summer and warmer months, the adult beetles chew their way out, leaving dime-sized, perfectly round exit holes, starting their life cycle all over
again to then continue their devastating effects.

Now here’s the most important part. We need your help. You are our first line of defense. Staff members and campers alike: we need your eyes to be on the lookout for signs of damage and the insect itself. And of course, please be aware of the risks of transporting forest pests when moving firewood. Adult beetles are most active during the summer and early fall. They can be seen on trees, branches, walls, outdoor furniture, cars, sidewalks and in pool filters. While the pest may appear threatening, it is harmless to humans and pets. With these unique characteristics, it’s easy to identify:
• 1 to 1 ½ inches in length
• Long antennae banded in black and white (longer than the insect’s
body)
• Shiny, jet black body with random white spots
• Six legs
• Legs may appear bluish in color

In addition to looking for the beetle, you can search for signs of
infestation, including:
• Shallow divits in the bark where the eggs are laid
• Dime-sized (1/4″ or larger), perfectly round exit holes in the tree
• Sawdust-like materials, called frass, on the ground and the branches
• Sap seeping from wounds in the tree

There is a wealth of information about the beetle that can be found online at www .BeetleBusters.info. There is even curriculum available to make searching for and learning about the invasive insect a fascinating experience for young people. I urge you to make raising awareness of this pest part of your camp program.

Unfortunately, a successful eradication involves very difficult realities. The toughest of these includes the removal of the infested trees, and potentially, other exposed trees. This is not only a complicated, but an emotional issue. When the goal is to protect our nation’s natural resources from threats, the concept of removing trees is a dif ficult one. But the threat from this invasive insect is far too severe to do nothing. The 13 genera of trees the insect is known to infest make up a sizeable portion of the trees in our nation.
Ash Katsura
Birch London planetree
Elm Maple
Goldenrain tree Mimosa
Hackberry Mountain ash
Horsechestnut Poplar
Katsura Willow
We’re in this fight together. If you see something, say something. Help stop the Asian longhorned beetle’s destruction by raising awareness about the pest and encouraging campers to report any signs or symptoms of an infestation immediately.

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Take Dad Camping for Father’s Day

Have you done your Father’s Day shopping yet? This year, instead of another tie or a fishing lure, give Dad a gift he will remember forever: a weekend of camping at Jellystone Park. Fishing, swimming, scavenger hunts, family movies and even indulging his inner caveman over an open campfire – so much better than cufflinks.
 
We have more fun going on than Dad can shake a stick at! Here’s a sample of what you can expect at Dad’s Day with Yogi Bear™. Visit your favorite park’s website to see what they have planned.
 
Waller, TX – Show Dad how special he is… treat dad to a relaxing Fathers Day get-a-way! Pancake Breakfast. FREE Pancakes for Dads. Make a special gift for Dad at the Craft Center. 

Madison, ME – Come join Yogi Bear and friends as they wish all the dads a happy day! Bring your dad for Saturday breakfast and Dads eat free!  

Branson, MO – There’s no better way to celebrate Dad’s special day than a trip to Jellystone Park Branson for a weekend of activities planned with Dad in mind. How Well Do You Know Your Father? Ride the Father’s Day hayride! Bar B Que Ribs Dinner ($).

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